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WHAT'S GOING ON DOWN THERE?
PEEING? POSTPARTUM SEX?

Every day in the guide has a pelvic floor series of exercises to complete. WHY? Because any pregnancy guide that does not include pelvic floor health is doing a disservice to you. Completing this important part of the guide could help you avoid lifelong issues such as incontinence, painful sex, and later in life surgeries to correct a sagging uterus or bladder. This is SUCH an important part of women’s health, mamas!

 
 
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PREVENTATIVE CARE! PREVENTATIVE CARE!
PREVENTATIVE CARE!

Women that use our guide can learn about the musculoskeletal/postural changes that will occur throughout pregnancy. Before birth, women can learn about proper body mechanics and posture, pelvic stabilization exercises, and stretching. The pelvic floor muscle training is a fundamental part in preparing for later pregnancy and delivery! Awareness of your pelvic floor assists in a vaginal birth. The guide teaches you how to strengthen the pelvic floor but also in the third trimester helps to learn how to relax the pelvic floor. As the baby travels down the birth canal you will want to be able to relax the pelvic floor during the contractions. Between contractions, it is helpful to know how to maintain some tone so the baby does not sneak back the other way and lose progress during delivery.

MANY other countries strongly encourage and sometimes require for postpartum moms to see a women’s health physical therapist (like Krystle!) six weeks after birth to get their pelvic floor evaluated. THAT is how important pelvic floor health is. We want to spread the word, empowering you to make smart decisions regarding this critical women’s health issue.

There is a relatively common misconception that fit people have stronger pelvic floors. They are exposed to MORE  physical stresses, which predisposes them to learn compensatory strategies such as using their abdominal and back muscles. This actually causes their pelvic floors to be more vulnerable. SO even if you are a fit sister, you need a workout plan for your pelvic floor.

 
 
 

PELVIC FLOOR MAINTENANCE

Maintaining pelvic floor health can avoid tearing and trauma to muscles in the vaginal area during delivery, allowing you to return to bedroom activity much more quickly.  For your reading pleasure, a muscle called your ischiocavernosus is attached to your clitoris and helps pull open your clitoral hood for extra exposure of your clitoris resulting in increased orgasms during sex. Sounds fun, right? Remember you and your partner are the reasons for these sweeties so don’t forget about where it all began.

 
 
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A COMPREHENSIVE PREGNANCY
FITNESS GUIDE

FOR EACH TRIMESTER